Tulsi who?

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Great optics for a presidential “candidate” there:

H J RES 77 2/3 YEA-AND-NAY 16-Oct-2019 2:44 PM
QUESTION: On Motion to Suspend the Rules and Pass
BILL TITLE: Opposing the decision to end certain United States efforts to prevent Turkish military operations against Syrian Kurdish forces in Northeast Syria

—- YEAS 354 —

—- NAYS 60 —

—- ANSWERED “PRESENT” 4 —

—- NOT VOTING 14 —

Gabbard

[emphasis added]

Speaker Nancy Pelosi (D): perfectly owning Donald Trump (r)

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He’s definitely not the brightest bulb in the chandelier:

Donald J. Trump @realDonaldTrump
Nervous Nancy’s unhinged meltdown!
[….]
5:29 PM · Oct 16, 2019

Speaker Nancy Pelosi’s (D) new cover photo on Twitter:

The Speaker (D) lives rent free inside of Donald Trump’s (r) head.

Bad combover. Check. Too long red tie. Check. Orange spray tan. Check. Tiny hands. Check. Cluelessness. Check…

Rep. Vicky Hartzler (R): don’t ask about Moscow Mitch

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Rep. Vicky Hartzler (r), in the House minority, will now be able to totally refocus her legislative agenda on naming post offices (November 7, 2019)

Representative Vicky Hartzler (r) [2016 file photo].

This morning:

Rep. Vicky Hartzler @RepHartzler
We have important legislation that is ready to move forward, including the #USMCA and the bipartisan bills to tackle prescription drug prices both parties worked together on in the Energy and Commerce Committee.

Instead, we’re naming 13 post offices today. We can do better.
8:34 AM – 16 Oct 2019

This is much hilarity in the responses:

Tell that to Mitch McConnell.

Hundreds of Bills passed by the House waiting to come to the Senate floor for a vote. “We can do better today.”

As of May of THIS year, you were all about renaming post offices.

Tell Mosco Mitch to get moving on the hundreds of bills sitting on his desk. Trump and the GOP are criminals.

How about you do something about the #GOPGenocide first. Get back to us when you have. Thanks.

You named a post office less than a year ago

Yeah, we were wondering about that.

Benedict Donald

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“Россия” (Russia) – a variant of the Russian presidential flag.

This:

Kurt Eichenwald @kurteichenwald
Today, Russia took over a US military base that was rapidly abandoned. I wonder if Trump gave time to shred/destroy classified info and devices, or if everything is now in Russian control.

PS: This is the first time in memory that the US has surrendered a base to Russia. MAGA!
12:11 PM · Oct 15, 2019/a>

Bad combover. Check. Too long red tie. Check. Orange spray tan. Check. Tiny hands. Check. Cluelessness. Check…

Rep. Vicky Hartzler (r): bless her heart

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Over two years ago:

GOP Aims To Kill Obamacare Yet Again After Failing 70 Times (July 29, 2017)

It didn’t happen. It was all about repeal anyway.

Representative Vicky Hartzler (r) [2018 file photo].

This afternoon, from Representative Vicky Hartzler (r):

Rep. Vicky Hartzler @RepHartzler
Our healthcare system is failing. High premiums force many to forgo insurance; sky-high deductibles mean they can’t afford to use it.

I look forward to working with @HouseGOP on a plan to protect those with pre-existing conditions and give Americans more control over healthcare.
2:59 PM · Oct 15, 2019

Yeah, right.

Medicare for all would work great.

Some of the responses:

I dunno. Ever think about something like the Affordable Care Act?

GOP had control for 2 years and came up with nothing.

Rich coming from someone who tried her damndest to eliminate health care coverage for millions of Americans.
#Hypocrite

How? You had full control for two years and the only thing you tried to do with healthcare was take it away!

Yep.

JUST STOP LYING!!! The @GOP wants to gut healthcare and you know it!!! Do your job stand up for us and against the criminal in the Oval. Hawley barely won you and @RoyBlunt have an up hill climb after you crapped on the small family owned farms. Get to work and impeach him!!!

Nah, she’s all in.

Why don’t you/they already have one. Trump PROMISED during his 2016 campaign that he had the BEST plan, with better coverage and lower premiums than the ACA.

Ask him to show you THAT great plan!

(Or was that a false promise, just like yours . . . . )

They were never going to create one, they were just going to take the one people had away.

So I guess that TWELVE YEARS you and your @GOP handlers said you were working hard on a superior replacement for the ACA was a lie?

Give or take a few. Actually, around eight years for Representative Hartzler (r).

Campaign Finance: the future looks murky

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Yesterday at the Missouri Ethics Commission, from one right wingnut PAC to another:

C190920 10/14/2019 Conservative Future Fund CL PAC 12026 Manchester Rd St Louis MO 63131 10/14/2019 $5,001.00

[emphasis added]

Add a dollar, make a public statement. What else is new?

Previously:

Campaign Finance: $100,000.00 or so at a time (September 3, 2019)

Campaign Finance: It couldn’t be anything we said (September 4, 2019)

Campaign Finance: every time a billionaire writes a $50,000.00 campaign contribution check a twenty-something right wingnut campaign operative gets their wings (September 16, 2019)

Campaign Finance: spreading it far and wide (September 30, 2019)

Are you nervous? You seem nervous…

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Bad combover. Check. Too long red tie. Check. Orange spray tan. Check. Tiny hands. Check. Cluelessness. Check…

Last night:

Donald J. Trump @realDonaldTrump
Shifty Schiff now seems to think they don’t need the Whistleblower, who started the whole Scam. The reason is that the Whistleblower has lost all credibility because the story is so far from the facts on the Transcript. Also, the second Whistleblower is no longer even mentioned!
7:17 PM · Oct 14, 2019

John Bolton (r) [2010 file photo].

Mayor Pete Buttigieg (D) – Town Hall Q and A – on Climate Change – Des Moines, Iowa – October 12, 2019

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Pete Buttigieg (D) – Des Moines, Iowa – October 12, 2019.

South Bend, Indiana Mayor Pete Buttigieg (D) continued his presidential campaign in Iowa with an outdoor town hall on the grounds of Roosevelt High School in Des Moines on Saturday night. After his opening remarks he addressed written questions from the audience which were randomly selected from a large glass jar.

A question and answer on climate change:

Question: First plan of attack for climate change.

Pete Buttigieg (D): Woo. Great question. I’m guessing that’s on the mind of a few people who are here. Look, we are coming up on the point of no return. Scientists tell us tell us we’ve got until 2030 before we hit the horizon of catastrophe. The real deadline isn’t 2030, it’s 2020, because if we don’t have the right kind of president now we’ll never be ready by 2030 to take those steps we’ve got to take.

So, there’s a whole bunch of things that we’ve got to do quick. We’ve got to quadruple Federal investment in renewable energy, energy storage, carbon storage. We’ve got to have a carbon price and dividend. Now, they way I would do it is, we assess a price on the cost of carbon, then we rebate it right back out to the American people with a progressive formula so most of us are more than made whole. ‘Cause it’s not about taking money out of the economy. It’s about making sure that the economy reflects the true cost of carbon. [voice: “Yeah!] Now, uh, big fan of carbon tax and dividend. I like that. [laughter] There we go.

But, look, I’m going to be honest with you, I think every one of us running for president ha a plan, as I do, to get our economy to be carbon neutral by 2050. We all do, and, of course, I think mine is the best one. But, [laughter] they all have the technical dimensions that are gonna be needed. The real question is, is any of it gonna get done. Otherwise all of our clever, elegant scientific proposals get multiplied by zero in terms of the impact they actually have. That’s one of the reasons it’s so important that we see to it that climate is a national project that everybody is part of the solution to.

That’s why we gotta tell people, some of whom have felt like they’re being clubbed over the head and told they’re the problem, and invite them to be the solution. For example, we cannot solve this problem without recruiting the energy, the support, and the creativity of America’s farmers. [….] We gotta send a message that we want climate solutions to come from America’s farm, farms in a way that we would be as proud of the quest for the carbon neutral farm as we are of solar panels and electric vehicles. And we can do it. But we’ve got to invest in it.

We can’t just tell farmers we want them to farm sustainably. If we want to unlock the potential of carbon capture in soil and covered crops and other things that we can do on America’s farms, we’ve got to invest in them. If we can find billions of dollars to pays farmers to not be able to sell their goods to China, you’re damn well sure we ought to be able to find billions of dollars in order to support farmers in leading the way to find a solution to the problem. [applause][cheers]

Previously:

South Bend, Indiana Mayor Pete Buttigieg (D) – Progress Iowa Corn Feed – Cedar Rapids, Iowa – July 14, 2019 (July 15, 2019)

Mayor Pete Buttigieg (D) – Town Hall – Des Moines, Iowa – October 12, 2019 (October 13, 2017)

Mayor Pete Buttigieg (D) – Town Hall Q and A – on the Electoral College – Des Moines, Iowa – October 12, 2019 (October 13, 2019)

Secretary of State Mike Pompeo (r): showing us who he really is

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“…Every day, too, I engage with foreign leaders who sit across the table from me, or sit in a room, and I try to understand what it is they want…”

Yes, he said that, apparently unaware of the irony.

“…And I’m especially telling the truth about the dire condition of religious freedom around the world. America has a proud history of religious freedom, and we want jealously to guard it here…”

Trump Muslim ban protest at Kansas City International Airport – January 29, 2017

Gaslighting
…A more psychological definition of gaslighting is “an increasing frequency of systematically withholding factual information from, and/or providing false information to, the victim – having the gradual effect of making them anxious, confused, and less able to trust their own memory and perception…

“…My team and I at the State Department are out there every day, using our diplomacy to fix the very conditions that allowed these evils to fester…”

He’s not aware of the Kurds, is he?

“…And that brings me to a second idea of the Christian leader: dialogue. How we speak, our speech, our dealings with others.

For a moment, back to the Book of James: ‘Everyone should be quick to listen, and slow to speak’…”

There’s a Twitter account I could show you.

A few lines from a spiritual:

“…Oh won’t you sit down?
Lord, I can’t sit down.

‘Cause I just got to heaven, gotta look around.

[…]

Who’s that yonder, dressed in black?
Must be the hypocrites a-turnin’ back…”

Being a Christian Leader
Speech
Michael R. Pompeo, Secretary of State
American Association of Christian Counselors
Gaylord Opryland Hotel, Nashville, Tennessee
October 11, 2019

SECRETARY POMPEO: Good morning, everyone. (Cheers.) Good morning. Good morning, thank you. Thank you. Good morning. Good morning, everyone. Thank you, Dr. Clinton, for that kind introduction. It’s great to be with you and your wife, Julie. It’s a real privilege to be with you, and it’s a heck of a deal to be out of Washington today. (Laughter.) I was going to give you some wisdom, said maybe you’ll hold your conference there next year, but I thought about it and that’d be a bad idea. (Laughter.) But Washington could use your spirit and your love.

And I want, too, to take just a moment to pass along – I spoke to the President yesterday, and I told him I was coming down here. He reminded me that Tennessee won the country. (Laughter.) I told him I knew that. But he said to send his regards and his love and his appreciation for what you do taking care of people all around the world.

I did want to talk to you about why I’m here. I’m the Secretary of State. I spend most of my time traveling around the world, but I wanted to come here because I have a profound appreciation for your mission. And when I had a chance to talk to Tim about the opportunity to come speak with you, I was thrilled to get the chance.
Look, we share some things in common. We talk to people through hard times. We find ourselves in the middle of disputes and we seek to mediate them and try and identify their root causes. We try to keep conflict minimized, at bay. And when you think about those missions, the missions that you all have, it sounds a lot like the diplomacy that me at the State Department and my team engage in every day.

We’re both in very people-intensive lines of work, and we’re both appealing to the hearts and minds to change behaviors. As believers, we draw on the wisdom of God to help us get it right, to be a force for good in the life of human beings.

Now, I know that even having just said that, I know some people in the media will break out the pitchforks when they hear that I ask God for direction in my work. (Applause.) But you should know, as much as I’d like to claim originality, it is not a new idea. (Laughter.) I love this quote from President Lincoln. He said that he – he said, quote, “I have been driven many times upon my knees by the overwhelming conviction that I had nowhere else to go.” (Laughter.)

And so with that in mind, I want to use my time today to think about what it means to be a Christian leader, a Christian leader in three areas:

First is disposition. How is it that one carries oneself in the world? The second is dialogue, talking. How is it that we engage with others around the world? And third is decisions, decisions that we make. How do we make choices? Upon what basis? What do we use as our bedrock to get to those decisions? These are things that you face in your work every day. They are issues that the State Department and President Trump, each of us, must face.

And my focus too, to be quite candid, is not just on being a leader. I learned how to lead at whatever level I’m blessed with during my time at West Point and other experiences, but I want to talk today about being a Christian leader. I learned that through a very different experience, an experience with God and my own personal faith in Christ.

Like a lot of people – and you don’t have to admit it today – but like a lot of people, I grew up going to church but with a relationship with God that wasn’t especially important for me, because I was destined to be in the NBA. (Laughter.) But as I grew older, when I started my time at the United States Military Academy, there were two young men – they were in the class ahead of me – who invited me to a Bible study. They were very intentional to me in explaining God’s Word. And after some study and discipleship with them, they helped me begin my walk with Christ.

And since then I’ve been privileged to have many different leadership roles. I was a captain in the United States Army in a cavalry unit. I was – I ran two small companies in my home state of Kansas. I served as a member of Congress trying to do my level best to represent the people of south-central Kansas. And then I served as CIA Director, and now I have the incredible privilege to serve President Trump as his 70th Secretary of State. I’m mindful he’s the 45th president, so there’s a lot more turnover in my job than in his. (Laughter.)

But back – Susan and I have been – had Christ at the center of our lives. Back in my church in Wichita I was a deacon. She and I taught fifth grade Sunday School, which was a great, great lesson for my time as Secretary of State. (Laughter and Applause.) But we also saw in that, in our time serving in that, we saw how many challenging issues that you all address every single day.

I’ve had the privilege to do it all alongside Susan, my wonderful Christian wife, and my son, Nick, who keeps me humble. Yeah, he reminded me. So I’m going to get off an airplane the other day at 3 o’clock in the morning, I forget where I was, and he texted me. It was a different time here on the East Coast. And he texted and said, “Dad, you almost fell down.” And he was not worried about me; he was worried about America. (Laughter.) He did not want me to embarrass America. (Laughter.) There is absolutely no shortage of leadership wisdom gathered from raising a teenage boy, I can certainly tell you that. (Laughter.)

And so my prayer today is that whatever understanding I’ve gained in these various opportunities that I’ve had, these blessings I’ve had to lead – some of which I’ve learned the hard way, for sure – I hope that I can share some of these with you today and it will bless you in your work as well.

We all know this: Before you can help others, you need to have the right approach to yourself. This is where I get to the first point I wanted to talk about, which is disposition. How – what’s the attitude with which we approach each of these challenges, all the things that we see in the world? How you carry yourself is the first arena of Christian leadership.

Scripture calls us to be “transformed by the renewing of [our] minds.” And so I keep a Bible open on my desk, and I try every morning to try and get in a little bit of time with the Book. I need my mind renewed with truth each day. And part of that truth is, as my son reminds me, is to be humble. Proverbs says, “With the humble is wisdom.”

Every day, as Secretary of State, I get a real chance to be humble, because I get to see the great work that my team is doing. I, like many of you, am also confronted with highly complex problem sets, and I need wisdom to try and make the right calls. I need to admit what I don’t know and try to learn it, to ask the questions that others might find obvious and be unembarrassed, and to accept conclusions when the facts are presented that might go against whatever preconceived notion that I might have had.

Indeed, this disposition is my duty; it’s my duty to the American people to pursue the outcomes based on an honest analysis of the facts as they present themselves. We know this, too – we see this in our lives: Pride can get in the way of that. But wisdom comes from a humble disposition.

And one more point on disposition: forgiveness. I love the story of the prodigal son in the Scripture: the son comes homes with his tail between his legs, he knows he’s messed up, and yet his father runs – runs – to welcome him back home.

The people who work for me know this, too: I have high standards for excellence. I hold them accountable and give them authority. I hold myself to that high set of standards because there is so much riding on what we do to keep the American people safe that we can’t accept anything less.

But when there is failure, when the people close to me misfire, I don’t strip away their responsibilities. I don’t cut them out of meetings. I keep them in the fold. I keep giving them important work. That’s what Christ does for us; we have an obligation to do the same.

We should all remember – we should all remember that we are imperfect servants serving a perfect God who constantly forgives us each and every day. He keeps using us – (applause) – he keeps using us to do a higher work. And my work at the State Department, as it is for those who work alongside of me, is to serve America each and every day.

And that brings me to a second idea of the Christian leader: dialogue. How we speak, our speech, our dealings with others.

For a moment, back to the Book of James: “Everyone should be quick to listen, and slow to speak.”

That’s a lesson I learned in the Army from a guy named SFC Pretre, and I was reminded of it in an interview this morning. (Laughter.) I’ll do better. (Laughter.) I was a brand new Second Lieutenant. I’d just arrived in Germany and I’d had my four years at West Point, and I was set to conquer the world. I went out to the field in a little tiny town in the far – then far-eastern stretches of West Germany, and there he was, a grizzled old soldier named Sergeant Pretre. And I walked up, he saluted me because I was the officer and he was the noncommissioned officer, and I greeted him, and he said, “Young man, you’ll do really well if you just shut up for a while.” (Laughter.) He actually had an adjective in there that I shall not use in polite company. (Laughter.)

I listened to him then, and I continued to listen. Every day, too, I engage with foreign leaders who sit across the table from me, or sit in a room, and I try to understand what it is they want. What are their objectives for their people? How can the United States deliver to help them in a way that treats America, the people that I am responsible for keeping safe – puts America first and delivers on behalf of the American people?

It reminds me, when I’m with them, that sound relationships absolutely depend on open ears. Good listening means more than just hearing; it means not rushing to judgment before you hear every side of a particular fact set. This comes through so clearly in Proverbs, which say, “The one who states his case first seems right, until the other comes and examines him.”

There’s a lot of times members of my team will come into my office and they respectfully disagree. They’ll have ideas that are different from mine or, in fact, often different from each other. I need to make sure that I listen, that I scrutinize each position before I say one is right or wrong, or that the truth is somewhere in between.

I’m sure you all see that. I’m sure you all see that in your research, in your studies, in the counseling that you do when you counsel people wrestling over a disagreement, whether that’s in their marriage or in a church matter or with their family. Let’s make sure we understand the facts. When we have that, we can begin to move forward and heal and solve problems.

After I’ve collected data, I feel like I have the seasoning to then be able to begin to speak fundamental basic, simple, small “t” truths. Colossians talks about this. It says, “Let your speech always be gracious, seasoned with salt, so that you may know how you ought to answer to each person.” I know this is a critical part of what so many of you do, whether it’s pointing those you counsel back to the truth of the Scripture, or giving them a hard wake-up call over their trespasses.

I’ve found this in life – truth telling isn’t just a matter of private conversations for me. It’s what I try to do publicly as we lay down President Trump’s foreign policy to keep Americans safe and secure.

This administration has spoken to the truth in many ways that previous administrations haven’t done. (Applause.) For example, on China’s rule-breaking and authoritarianism; for example, on why the Islamic Republic of Iran is an aggressor, not a victim; for why, in fact, we know in our hearts that America is a force for good in the world. (Applause.)

And I’m especially telling the truth about the dire condition of religious freedom around the world. America has a proud history of religious freedom, and we want jealously to guard it here. But around the world, more than 80% of mankind lives in areas where religious freedom is suppressed or denied in its entirety.

The Chinese Communist Party – as we sit here today in the beautiful facility in Nashville, the Chinese Communist Party is detaining and abusing more than one million Uighur Muslims in internment camps in the Xinjiang. It’s the western region of China. The pages of George Orwell’s 1984 are coming to life there. I wish the NBA would acknowledge that. (Applause.)

So Christian pastors today are being unlawfully arrested, beaten, detained inside the Islamic Republic of Iran. We need to speak about this.

Christian areas in northern Iraq that I’ve had the privilege to visit have been ravaged by ISIS, part of a greater trend of Christian persecution all across the Middle East.

And so the truth – for the past two years we’ve spoken the truth. We’ve hosted ministerials. We bring leaders from all around the world called the Ministerial on Religious Freedom at the State Department. We’ve told the world about these shortfalls and the success of nations when individuals are given their basic human dignity to practice their conscience, their faith, or to choose no faith if they so choose all around the world.

We hosted the largest human rights conference ever at the United States Department of State just this past summer. It was truly remarkable. Faith leaders from all across the globe came together at our beautiful facility in the western party of Washington, D.C. to talk about the importance of religious freedom.

Just this week, the United States made a decision. We put visa restrictions on those responsible for the some of the human rights violations that took place in China and that continue to take place today.

And we’ve stopped American companies from exporting certain products to Chinese tech companies that are enabling these very human rights abuses. We did these things under President Trump’s direction for the simple reason that we know Americans do not want their companies building the machinery of a totalitarian surveillance state.

There’s so much more work to do. I would ask you today to pray for my work in defending religious freedom. (Applause.)

This is – look, I’ll be straight up with you – I’m from Kansas – but this is not a popular conversation to raise in Washington, D.C. sometimes, and sometimes not with other leaders around the world as well. But the world needs to hear this truth. And with you all, or with you having your voices being raised for this purpose, I am confident that we can improve human dignity for individuals all across the world. (Applause.)

Now for my final thought on Christian leadership. I want to talk about how it is we make decisions, individual decisions in our personal lives, in our family lives, and other decisions as well.

Let’s start with some of the toughest decisions of all: those involving money. I know you all see this as Christian counselors. I’m willing to bet my organization’s budget is a little bigger than yours. Although this is a big group. (Laughter.) But no matter whether it’s your family’s finances or you’re responsible for protecting taxpayer funds and being a good steward, as I am today, the Bible calls us to be faithful in our stewardship of whatever it is that we have been privileged to hold onto, no matter how much or how little. We have to be faithful in every single circumstance.

Think of that famous parable of the talents. The servant called “good and faithful” used what he had wisely.

Last year – and I confront this with some frequency – last year, I had a group of folks in my office who came and said, “Mike, we have this project we want to work on. It’s going to spend tens of millions of dollars. Here’s how we’re going to deliver that. Here’s the end state that we’re seeking.” And just like you do in your life every day and each as you do in your – the faith part of your life as well, I asked a handful of simple questions about whether this would be a responsible use of the American people’s money? Are we going to create value for the American people?

In this particular case, I recall it was a close call. It was a difficult decision. I ultimately decided that spending these resources was appropriate and that we’d put in place a set of metrics that would ensure that we delivered a good outcome for the American people. I’m sure you – there are many pastors out here – you make decisions, too, about how to spend the money you’re your flock has so generously contributed to the Lord. And I know you’ll do the best for your congregation and for your church as well. And you’ll do that remembering this important Christian leadership principle, this call for stewardship.

Because we are mindful that decisions are a question of priorities, often. I just talked about one decision we made at the State Department. It meant that those resources couldn’t be spent elsewhere. We were setting a priority. And I am grateful that my call as a Christian to protect human dignity overlaps with America’s centuries-old commitment to the same mission in our foreign policy all across the world.

My day is often scheduled into 15-minute increments. Every now and again I get a half hour, and every now and again I get to hear some of the beautiful worship music that I was able to sit with you for. I need to be intentional – we each need to be intentional – about carving out time to pursue the mission of defending human dignity.

I’m proud to say that President Trump has let our State Department do that. Indeed, he has demanded that we do.

International organizations will try, from time to time, to sneak language into their documents claiming that abortion is a human right. And we’ll never accept that. (Applause and cheers.) We’ve worked diligently to find every dollar that might be going to that and we have worked tirelessly and successfully now to bring it nearly to an end.

We also face situations around the world of human trafficking. We’re exposing them. We’re fighting them. (Applause and cheers.)

Earlier this year, our Diplomatic Security Service came across a young woman and pulled her out of a human trafficking situation not too far from here in Dallas, Texas. This young woman was separated from her mother and she had been shipped off to the United States from Guinea when she was just a small child.

She had been toiling for 12 to 16 hours a day, seven days a week, without pay: cooking and cleaning and caring for five children of a wealthy Texas family. She wasn’t permitted to attend school. She didn’t receive medical care. She wasn’t allowed to play with the other children in the neighborhood.

This young woman endured sheer misery for 16 years until, with the help of concerned neighbors, she escaped.

The blessing in this story is that her case came to the attention of the United States Department of State. We became the lead investigator in the case, and one of our agents tracked down this young woman’s mother, who had been desperate to see her again. (Applause.) We were able to fly her to Texas to testify at trial. She was there to vouch for the girl’s identity, to say, “This is my daughter.”

Ultimately, the perpetrators were put in prison for a good long time. And the girl is, today, working towards her GED and receiving counseling and living a wonderful life. (Applause.)

These violations of the most fundamental freedoms, human dignity that I spoke about today – religious persecution, human trafficking, political repression – they leave deep scars.

And I am sure that some of you – and especially our friends who have traveled here from overseas today – I’m sure you counsel folks who are healing from those kinds of traumas.

My team and I at the State Department are out there every day, using our diplomacy to fix the very conditions that allowed these evils to fester.

Others will confront these evils closer to home, where the emotional aftermath is no less terrible: vicious abuse, or the opioid epidemic, just to name a couple.

But no matter what comes before you, I pray you’ll help hurting people stay immersed in God’s Word. By remaining humble. By showing forgiveness. By listening intently and carefully and thoughtfully. By not rushing to judgment in complicated matters. By being a faithful steward. By using your time with intentionally.

And I pray you’ll do these things not out of your own strength, but by relying on, as Paul says, “Him who is able to do immeasurably more than all we are able to ask or to imagine.”

You will all be in my prayers as you do God’s work, and I covet yours as I lead American diplomacy.

Thank you for joining me here today. God bless you. And may God bless the United States of America. Thank you, all. (Applause and cheers.)

“…Earlier this year, our Diplomatic Security Service came across a young woman and pulled her out of a human trafficking situation not too far from here in Dallas, Texas. This young woman was separated from her mother and she had been shipped off to the United States from Guinea when she was just a small child…”

But, the United States separating children from their asylum seeking parents, then placing them in cages, is okay?

“…I’ve found this in life – truth telling isn’t just a matter of private conversations for me. It’s what I try to do publicly as we lay down President Trump’s foreign policy to keep Americans safe and secure…”

Jamal Ahmad Khashoggi. Say his name.

“…Who’s that yonder, dressed in black?
Must be the hypocrites a-turnin’ back…”

Mayor Pete Buttigieg (D) – Town Hall Q and A – on the Electoral College – Des Moines, Iowa – October 12, 2019

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Pete Buttigieg (D) – Des Moines, Iowa – October 12, 2019.

South Bend, Indiana Mayor Pete Buttigieg (D) continued his presidential campaign in Iowa with an outdoor town hall on the grounds of Roosevelt High School in Des Moines last night. After his opening remarks he addressed written questions from the audience which were randomly selected from a large glass jar.

A question and answer on the Electoral College:

Question: …the talk of eliminating the Electoral College seems shortsighted and fails to recognize the Great Compromise which our country was founded upon.

Pete Buttigieg (D): [….] So, look, call me simple-minded, I just think in a Democracy the best way to elect our leaders is to count up all the votes and give it to the person who got the most. [cheers]

Now, I know there’s the Great Compromise, but let’s admit that was a compromise with slavery.

And to the extent that there is a defense of the Electoral College it used to be that it helped small states. Right? Only today it doesn’t help small states. It just helps some states. Think about it. A small state like Rhode Island doesn’t count ’cause it’s too liberal. A mall state like Wyoming doesn’t count ’cause it’s too conservative. A medium state like Indiana doesn’t count because we’re too conservative. But a big state like California ’cause it’s too liberal.

And here’s the other thing, the other argument that I used to find convincing, to be honest, was that candidates wouldn’t visit certain areas if it weren’t for the Electoral College. Although, again, look at all the areas that are being cut our right now.

But here’s the other thing, when you’re electing the Governor of Iowa, right, you don’t have counties vote. People vote. And then the person who gets the most votes gets to be the governor. And I’m pretty sure that anybody who’s ever run for Governor of Iowa has gone to the big cities and they’ve gone to the small towns. Because it’s the right thing to do and it’s how you reach them.

So, I believe that’s, it, after all, it’s how we run every other election we do in this country.

And the other thing I would mention is, if you really want to think about it, this is what I’m getting at when I talk about how politics is personal. Think about how your life is different because of the Electoral College. How would your life personally change because the Electoral College exists instead of a national popular vote. And there are two big ways that your life is different.

Your life is different because we have President Bush instead of President Gore, which means among other things, that the Iraq War affected you in any way. Uh, then your life changed because of the Electoral College. And your life is different, if you think that your life is different in any way because Donald Trump is President of the United States. Those are the biggest things that happened in your life because of the Electoral College.

And I just think that overruling the American people isn’t Democratic. I think we can honor the concerns of people in rural areas, in urban, big states and small, different kinds of counties and communities. But do it in a way where everybody’s vote counts exactly the same.

I just think that’s the fairest way to run an election. [cheers][applause]

Previously:

South Bend, Indiana Mayor Pete Buttigieg (D) – Progress Iowa Corn Feed – Cedar Rapids, Iowa – July 14, 2019 (July 15, 2019)

Mayor Pete Buttigieg (D) – Town Hall – Des Moines, Iowa – October 12, 2019 (October 13, 2017)