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Senator Claire McCaskill, commenting on the Iran election in a Twitter post:

clairecmc The Iranian elections make me very grateful to be an American. Home of truly free speech and fair elections. Hope reformers don’t lose hope. about 9 hours ago from web

Blue Girl replied:

TheyGaveUsARep @clairecmc Uh huh. How do you say “Florida” in Farsi? about 8 hours ago from web in reply to clairecmc

I wish I had written that.

An individual asked me yesterday, after watching the news video of Iranians taking to the streets, “Why didn’t we do that in 2000?” I replied, “Some did.”

Miami ‘Riot’ Squad: Where Are They Now?

By Al Kamen

Monday, January 24, 2005; Page A13

As we begin the second Bush administration, let’s take a moment to reflect upon one of the most historic episodes of the 2000 battle for the White House — the now-legendary “Brooks Brothers Riot” at the Miami-Dade County polling headquarters.

This was when dozens of “local protesters,” actually mostly Republican House aides from Washington, chanted “Stop the fraud!” and “Let us in!” when the local election board tried to move the re-counting from an open conference room to a smaller space….

And they were all rewarded quite nicely.

And most of our media was too lazy, too stupid, or too complicit to expose the fakery.

In addition to not counting the votes there were other far reaching consequences:

GEORGE W. BUSH, et al., PETITIONERS v.

ALBERT GORE, Jr., et al.

ON WRIT OF CERTIORARI TO THE FLORIDA SUPREME COURT

[December 12, 2000]

Justice Stevens, with whom Justice Ginsburg and Justice Breyer join, dissenting…

…What must underlie petitioners’ entire federal assault on the Florida election procedures is an unstated lack of confidence in the impartiality and capacity of the state judges who would make the critical decisions if the vote count were to proceed. Otherwise, their position is wholly without merit. The endorsement of that position by the majority of this Court can only lend credence to the most cynical appraisal of the work of judges throughout the land. It is confidence in the men and women who administer the judicial system that is the true backbone of the rule of law. Time will one day heal the wound to that confidence that will be inflicted by today’s decision. One thing, however, is certain. Although we may never know with complete certainty the identity of the winner of this year’s Presidential election, the identity of the loser is perfectly clear. It is the Nation’s confidence in the judge as an impartial guardian of the rule of law.

I respectfully dissent.

Time has not healed the wound.