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Two bills, HB 1319 and HB 1320, which were filed today vividly illustrate the vast chasm between practical reality and fringe ideology in Missouri’s General Assembly. Which is which probably depends on one’s point view of the universe. The ultimate impact on society if each becomes law couldn’t be more different.

Representative Jeanie Riddle (r) filed HB 1319 which:

Lowers the age for concealed carry endorsements from 21 to 18

Teenagers carrying concealed firearms is a good idea? Any guesses about the possibility of this one making it through the republican controlled General Assembly?

Representative Mary Still (D) filed HB 1320:

SECOND REGULAR SESSION

HOUSE BILL NO. 1320

96TH GENERAL ASSEMBLY

INTRODUCED BY REPRESENTATIVES STILL (Sponsor), AULL, KANDER, WEBBER, ELLINGER, OXFORD, SCHUPP, ATKINS, KRATKY, McGEOGHEGAN, McNEIL, SWEARINGEN, PACE, NEWMAN, HODGES, TALBOY, McMANUS, SIFTON, LAMPE, SMITH (71), QUINN, HUMMEL, McDONALD, NICHOLS, PIERSON AND HARRIS (Co-sponsors).

4543L.01I                                                                                           D. ADAM CRUMBLISS, Chief Clerk

AN ACT

To amend chapter 130, RSMo, by adding thereto one new section relating to campaign contributions.

Be it enacted by the General Assembly of the state of Missouri, as follows:

           Section A. Chapter 130, RSMo, is amended by adding thereto one new section, to be known as section 130.032, to read as follows:

           130.032. 1. In addition to the limitations imposed under section 130.031, the amount of contributions made by or accepted from any person other than the candidate in any one election shall not exceed the following:

           (1) To elect an individual to the office of governor, lieutenant governor, secretary of state, state treasurer, state auditor, or attorney general, two thousand dollars;

           (2) To elect an individual to the office of state senator, one thousand dollars;

           (3) To elect an individual to the office of state representative, five hundred dollars;

           (4) To elect an individual to any other office, including judicial office, if the population of the electoral district, ward, or other unit according to the latest decennial census is under one hundred thousand, five hundred dollars;

           (5) To elect an individual to any other office, including judicial office, if the population of the electoral district, ward, or other unit according to the latest decennial census is at least one hundred thousand but less than two hundred fifty thousand, one thousand dollars; and

           (6) To elect an individual to any other office, including judicial office, if the population of the electoral district, ward, or other unit according to the latest decennial census is at least two hundred fifty thousand, two thousand dollars.

[….]

Campaign finance limits. The impact on society and Democracy if multimillionaires can’t drop a few million dollars on a candidate or an initiative campaign? Priceless.

Any guesses about this one making it through the republican run General Assembly? Yep, less than none.

There’s a definite difference.