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Progressive Change Campaign Committee/Democracy for America/Credo Action/MoveOn commissioned a series of polls in Missouri, Ohio, Minnesota, and Montana. The Missouri poll interviews were from May 13-16 and included 1,050 Missouri voters. The margin of error is 3%:

PCCC/DFA/Credo/MoveOn poll — Budget issues in swing states

QUESTION: In order to reduce the national debt, would you support or oppose cutting spending on Social Security, which is the retirement program for the elderly?

Missouri 17% support 76% oppose

QUESTION: In order to reduce the national debt, would you support or oppose cutting spending on Medicare, which is the government health insurance program for the elderly?

Missouri 19% support 77% oppose

QUESTION: In order to reduce the national debt, would you support or oppose cutting spending on Medicaid, which is the government health insurance program for the poor, disabled, and children?

Missouri 32% support 63% oppose

It’d be nice to get a look at the demographics.

What’s interesting is that the right has done such a great job of vilifying Medicaid that significantly more respondents are into cutting off the “poor, disabled, and children” from access to health care. So much for altruism.

Senator Claire McCaskill (D) at about the same PPP had their poll in the field:

Truman Days 2011: Senator Claire McCaskill (D) (May 15, 2011)

Senator Claire McCaskill (D): ….So how are we gonna get through the next decade and maintain our priorities and values? This will be a challenge. And I want to make sure no one leaves this room without me saying very clearly how serious the problem is. It is impossible to find a country in the world that has had economic growth when their debt equaled their GDP. When the debt in a country had equaled their gross domestic production countries don’t grow. Now, we are gonna be there in less than ten years. We will be there. So, if we don’t want to get there we all have to be honest and realistic about what has to happen. Does it have to be the way [Republican Congressman] Paul Ryan wants it to be? No, of course not. it does not have to be the way Paul Ryan. Do we have to end Medicare? No, we do not and we will not end Medicare, [applause, cheers] not on my watch. But we have a fight to in the future. And we have to have targeted investments in infrastructure, in innovation, and of course, in education. But we also have to realize that the footprint of the federal government is gonna have to shrink. And we do have to have a tax code that is less tilted towards the very, very, very, very wealthy in this country. [applause]….

If the poll is any indication the response to republicans shouldn’t just be no, it should be hell no. And that response shouldn’t just be for the benefit of the Democratic base, but to everyone.

If Democrats don’t incessantly club the republicans over the head with Medicare in 2012 they deserve to lose everything.