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Previously: Sen. Ed Emery (r): if you want Medicaid move to another state (May 19, 2014)

In the Missouri Constitution, in not one, but two places:

Missouri Constitution

Article I

BILL OF RIGHTS

Section 7

Public aid for religious purposes–preferences and discriminations on religious grounds.

Section 7. That no money shall ever be taken from the public treasury, directly or indirectly, in aid of any church, sect or denomination of religion, or in aid of any priest, preacher, minister or teacher thereof, as such; and that no preference shall be given to nor any discrimination made against any church, sect or creed of religion, or any form of religious faith or worship.

Article IX

EDUCATION

Section 8

Prohibition of public aid for religious purposes and institutions.

Section 8. Neither the general assembly, nor any county, city, town, township, school district or other municipal corporation, shall ever make an appropriation or pay from any public fund whatever, anything in aid of any religious creed, church or sectarian purpose, or to help to support or sustain any private or public school, academy, seminary, college, university, or other institution of learning controlled by any religious creed, church or sectarian denomination whatever; nor shall any grant or donation of personal property or real estate ever be made by the state, or any county, city, town, or other municipal corporation, for any religious creed, church, or sectarian purpose whatever.

Senator Ed Emery (r) on higher education yesterday, via Facebook:

Ed Emery

[….]

“Let every student be plainly instructed, and earnestly pressed to consider well, the main end of his life studies is, to know God and Jesus Christ which is eternal life.” – Harvard University Original Mission Statement, 1636

During this legislative session, as seen with passing both the student transfer bill and the Common Core bill, education was a top priority for the General Assembly. As the graduation season is upon us, many students will be preparing to head to college this fall.

During the session, we heard a higher education bill, which included performance funding – meaning that starting in 2016, a certain amount of state funding – based on performance – will be distributed, holding these schools accountable for the quality of education they provide. It is common for parents to be unaware of what their child is learning when they are away from home, but it is crucial that parents stay involved. In a recent report published by Phyllis Schlafly, she discusses the drastic shift on college campuses and the breakdown of traditional values among students. Schlafly makes some startling observations and passionate admonitions which are summarized below.

Before you send your child off to college, think for a moment about the quality of education you are getting for the $20,000-$50,000 a year. To get a glimpse into what your child will be learning, visit a university bookstore and browse through the required text books. Many of the history books give a one-sided perspective of the United States being a bully that is exploiting third-world nations and paints the Founders as racist slave owning elites who only declared their independence to preserve their own wealth and social status. Many text books describe big government as the only humane way in which a country can be ruled and claim that it is the duty of the government to provide for everyone, rather than protect their lives, liberty and property.

The problem is the way this information is being taught. If a student takes a history class in which they learn about Marxism, they may study and fulfill all of the requirements to pass without ever being challenged to think critically about the topic. For example, students learn about the ideas of Socialism and the basis on which it is built, but they seldom learn of the instances throughout history where this ideology has been tried and failed, from the pilgrims to Zimbabwe to the USSR. Schlafly’s research points out that at Columbia Teachers College, students learn that non-Socialist societies are the root cause of all violence.

Today on many campuses, students are given the opportunity to take a variety of classes including those on gender studies, many of which teach that the traditional roles of male and female are learned behaviors which can be changed if the person so chooses. In Schlafly’s report, she talks about a course at the University of Missouri-St. Louis that uses a textbook entitled Women’s Voices, Feminist Visions. She states that this textbook explains to students that heterosexuality only exists because of socially imposed stereotypes and homophobia, and has nothing to do with nature or morality. It teaches students that the oppression of minority groups is one of many ways for the majority to keep its special privileges. Frequently those expressing their own belief in traditional values are condemned as being ignorant or unaccepting. Even at the simplest levels, students are kept from expressing traditional ideas.

The outcry for “equality,” as opposed to exceptionalism on college campuses, has created a gross double standard. To teach traditional values or concepts is considered politically incorrect and students who want to live by these values find themselves persecuted. In Schlafly’s article, she describes a situation at Rollins College in Florida which recently ruled that Christian student clubs, who require student officers to be Christian, are in violation of the school’s “non-discrimination policy” and will not receive any university funds allotted to student organizations. Many often forget that most universities were founded as Christian learning institutions. Harvard’s original motto was “Truth for Christ and the Church,” and Yale University was originally founded to train Christian ministers. As you can see, today’s universities have exponentially strayed from this idea.

For many students, college can be a time in which their faith and values are tested. It is important as parents to help your student select a college carefully and to arm them with the tools they need to remain strong in their beliefs and values. Education forms the future. We cannot leave the future of Missouri or this great nation in the hands of the amoral education elite. Parents must take charge, and that requires involvement-not just in K-12, but in every institution that either forms or conforms the minds of our children.

“Let every student be plainly instructed, and earnestly pressed to consider well, the main end of his life studies is, to know God and Jesus Christ which is eternal life.” – Harvard University Original Mission Statement, 1636

Uh, you do know that Harvard University was and still is a private, not state, institution, right?

“….During the session, we heard a higher education bill, which included performance funding – meaning that starting in 2016, a certain amount of state funding – based on performance – will be distributed, holding these schools accountable for the quality of education they provide. It is common for parents to be unaware of what their child is learning when they are away from home, but it is crucial that parents stay involved….” [emphasis added]

Uh, once an individual is eighteen years of age or older (achieving the legal age of majority) parents have no right to be involved:

The Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA) (20 U.S.C. ยง 1232g; 34 CFR Part 99) is a Federal law that protects the privacy of student education records. The law applies to all schools that receive funds under an applicable program of the U.S. Department of Education.

FERPA gives parents certain rights with respect to their children’s education records. These rights transfer to the student when he or she reaches the age of 18 or attends a school beyond the high school level. Students to whom the rights have transferred are “eligible students.”

[emphasis added]

And:

[…..]

Section 99.31(a)(8)  Prior Consent Not Required for Disclosures to Parents of a Dependent Student

The Secretary clarifies that educational agencies and institutions may disclose education records to the parents of a dependent student, as defined in section 152 of the Internal Revenue Code of 1986, without the student’s consent. An educational agency or institution may disclose education records to either parent of a dependent student, regardless of which parent claims the student as a dependent.

[….]

[emphasis added]

The language is permissive, not mandatory.

“…Schlafly’s research points out that at Columbia Teachers College, students learn that non-Socialist societies are the root cause of all violence…”

Uh, the Teachers College, Columbia University is a private institution:

Columbia University was founded in 1754 as King’s College by royal charter of King George II of England. It is the oldest institution of higher learning in the state of New York and the fifth oldest in the United States.

Controversy preceded the founding of the College, with various groups competing to determine its location and religious affiliation. Advocates of New York City met with success on the first point, while the Anglicans prevailed on the latter. However, all constituencies agreed to commit themselves to principles of religious liberty in establishing the policies of the College….

“…In Schlafly’s article, she describes a situation at Rollins College in Florida which recently ruled that Christian student clubs, who require student officers to be Christian, are in violation of the school’s “non-discrimination policy” and will not receive any university funds allotted to student organizations….”

Rollins College?:

Founded in 1885 by New England Congregationalists who sought to bring their style of liberal arts education to the Florida frontier, Rollins is a four-year, coeducational institution and the first recognized college in Florida.

Uh, Rollins College is a private institution.

That “performance funding” thing in Missouri, from SB 492 [pdf]?:

[….]

….Each public four-year institution, each community college, and the state technical college shall utilize the five institutional performance measures it has submitted to, and that were approved by, the coordinating board for higher education as of the effective date of this act, for performance funding under sections 163.191, 173.1540, and 178.638.

[….]

[emphasis added]

Performance funding in SB 492 applies to public institutions in Missouri.

“….Many often forget that most universities were founded as Christian learning institutions….As you can see, today’s universities have exponentially strayed from this idea…”

Not according to the Missouri Constitution as it applies to public institutions in the state. Unless, of course, one has difficulties with reading comprehension and critical thinking.

Gee, the University of Missouri, St. Louis has a course that uses a textbook that Phyllis Schlafly and Senator Emery (r) don’t like. Apparently that qualifies the institution and its entire curriculum as enablers of heresy. Except it is a public institution, not one operated as an instrument of “Christian learning”.

“…We cannot leave the future of Missouri or this great nation in the hands of the amoral education elite…”

That says it all, doesn’t it?