Tags

, , , ,

In Missouri there are no limits on campaign contributions.

A bill to limit campaign contributions was introduced yesterday by Representative Jill Schupp (D):

SECOND REGULAR SESSION

HOUSE BILL NO. 1955

97TH GENERAL ASSEMBLY

INTRODUCED BY REPRESENTATIVES SCHUPP (Sponsor), MCNEIL, ENGLUND, MCCANN BEATTY, WALTON GRAY, NORR AND KELLY (45) (Co-sponsors).

4932L.03I    D. ADAM CRUMBLISS, Chief Clerk

AN ACT

To amend chapter 130, RSMo, by adding thereto one new section relating to campaign contributions.

Be it enacted by the General Assembly of the state of Missouri, as follows:

           Section A. Chapter 130, RSMo, is amended by adding thereto one new section, to be known as section 130.032, to read as follows:

           130.032. 1. In addition to the limitations imposed under section 130.031, the amount of contributions made by or accepted from any person other than the candidate in any one election shall not exceed the following:

           (1) To elect an individual to the office of governor, lieutenant governor, secretary of state, state treasurer, state auditor, or attorney general, five thousand dollars;

           (2) To elect an individual to the office of state senator, one thousand five hundred dollars;

           (3) To elect an individual to the office of state representative, seven hundred fifty dollars;

           (4) To elect an individual to any other office, including judicial office, if the population of the electoral district, ward, or other unit according to the latest decennial census does not exceed fifty thousand, seven hundred fifty dollars;

           (5) To elect an individual to any other office, including judicial office, if the population of the electoral district, ward, or other unit according to the latest decennial census is more than fifty thousand but does not exceed one hundred fifty thousand, one thousand five hundred dollars; and

           (6) To elect an individual to any other office, including judicial office, if the population of the electoral district, ward, or other unit according to the latest decennial census is greater than one hundred fifty thousand, five thousand dollars.

           2. For purposes of this subsection, “base year amount” shall be the contribution limits prescribed in this section on January 1, 2015. Such limits shall be increased on the first day of January in each even-numbered year by multiplying the base year amount by the cumulative consumer price index, as defined in section 104.010 and rounded to the nearest twenty-five dollar amount, for all years since January 1, 2015.

           3. Every committee established under this chapter shall be subject to the limits prescribed in subsection 1 of this section. The provisions of this subsection shall not limit the amount of contributions that may be accumulated by a candidate committee and used for expenditures to further the nomination or election of the candidate who controls such candidate committee.

           4. Contributions from persons under fourteen years of age shall be considered made by the parents or guardians of such person and shall be attributed toward any contribution limits prescribed in this chapter. Where the contributor under fourteen years of age has two custodial parents or guardians, fifty percent of the contribution shall be attributed to each parent or guardian, and where such contributor has one custodial parent or guardian, all such contributions shall be attributed to the custodial parent or guardian.

           5. Contributions received and expenditures made before January 1, 2015, shall be reported as a separate account and under the laws in effect at the time such contributions are received or expenditures made. Contributions received and expenditures made after January 1, 2015, shall be reported under the provisions of this chapter as a separate account from the other separate account described in this subsection. The account reported under the prior law shall be retained as a separate account and any remaining funds in such account may be used under this chapter.

           6. Any committee that accepts or gives contributions other than those allowed shall be subject to a surcharge of one thousand dollars plus an amount equal to the contribution per nonallowable contribution, to be paid to the ethics commission and which shall be transferred to the director of revenue, upon notification of such nonallowable contribution by the ethics commission, and after the candidate has had ten business days after receipt of notice to return the contribution to the contributor. The candidate and the candidate committee treasurer or deputy treasurer owing a surcharge shall be personally liable for the payment of the surcharge or may pay such surcharge only from campaign funds existing on the date of the receipt of notice. Such surcharge shall constitute a debt to the state enforceable under, but not limited to, the provisions of chapter 143.

[emphasis added]

It’s a step in the right direction.

The Red Lily, Anatole France

…For the poor it consists in sustaining and preserving the wealthy in their power and their laziness. The poor must work for this, in presence of the majestic quality of the law which prohibits the wealthy as well as the poor from sleeping under the bridges, from begging in the streets, and from stealing bread…

Here’s a modest proposal: limit campaign monetary contributions to eight times the hourly minimum wage. That is, a day’s wage for honest work – a “reasonable” amount available to every working adult in the state, no matter their economic status.

After that if you want to contribute more to a campaign using your individual sweat equity by going door to door, doing literature drops, walking in parades, stuffing envelopes, whatever, then go ahead and knock yourself out.